Art and Sweetcorn

May 7, 2011

In September 2009 my younger daughter Alina came to my studio for an hour or two. That visit led to an illustrated short story “Art and Sweetcorn”.
Here it is:

Illustrated short story "art and Sweetcorn"

Alina Making Art

Sweetcorn is hot this season.

On the way to the studio I made a detour to the Farmers’ Market, but going home in the evening forgot the bag with the goodies behind.

– Alina, I’ve got sweetcorn in the studio. Would you like to come with me to get it?
– Ye-ye-yeah!

Off we go.
Out of the door, turn left…

– Mummy, can we take the shortcut?
– That way takes longer, Alina!
– I don’t care!
– OK.

carry on down The Mint;
up through the inn car park;
right down the cobbled street;
past the corner house with the pigeons;
take the passage on the left;
past the lamp-post;
into the court yard.

Some days my girls like to come to my studio, some days they don’t. Depends.

– Alina, would you like to cook the corn here, or would you rather go home?
– I don’t mind, mummy, I can eat it cold.
– Yes, but it’s not cooked: you have to cook it first.
– Aw… (disappointment strength 8/10). Can I do painting while it’s being cooked then?
– You may.
– I want to do Art.

print_drypoint_artwork1

“Artwork” 1

Sweetcorn’s in the pan.

– Which paint would you like, this (oils) or this (acrylics)?
– I want this one (acrylics).
– There you go.
– Can I have those little rolling things as well?
– Yes, sure. And there is your paper.

She is all settled, painting on the floor;
I am at the table, drawing her.
We are busy doing Art.
Silence.

Short story by Marina Kim "Art and Sweetcorn"

“Artwork” – 3

Sweet aroma slowly fills the room…

– Mummy?
– Hm?
– Is the sweetcorn ready yet?
(glance at the clock)
– No, not yet. Another 10 minutes or so…
– Aw…

5 minutes later:
– Mummy!
– Hm?
– I think the sweetcorn is ready now.
– Uh-ehm…
– Come on, then!
– Okay! – I put the pencil down and get the sweetcorn.

It is hot. I put one cob under the running cold water. Alina comes to the sink to wash her hands.
– Mummy?
– Yes?
– I painted the difference between the Sea and the Soil.
– Oh, cool!

Short story "Art and Sweetcorn"

“Artwork” 2

Hands clean, she is content.
– Can I eat my sweetcorn now?
– Ah-a.
I give her the cooled-down cob, and place the plate with more of them on the arm of the chair. She climbs into the chair. Satisfaction 10/10. Life is good.

Short story "Art and Sweetcorn"

“Sweetcorn”

– Alina, are you going to paint any more?
– Nah-ah.
– In that case, you need to tidy up.
– Arrgghh, Godddd!

Marina Kim

Autumn, 2009

https://www.etsy.com/assets/js/etsy_mini_shop.js//

Browsing the Internet I re-visited the Portrait Party site. That reminded me of a portrait exchange we had with John Izod of Rye.

Commission a portrait by Marina Kim.

John Izod

John was one of the first people we got to know when moved to Rye. Since then we came to realise that he became in a way a feature of the town. Drawing from our conversation during sittings, I see him as a bit of a gypsy, artistic wonderer, an aged child…

The idea was to draw him and sell that on a charity auction for the Sea Cadets whom he supports. That charcoal drawing of him is now hanging in the “Ypres” pub in Rye after having raised £250 as far as I remember.

But there were more drawings coming from those couple of sittings.

 

Commission a portrait drawing by Marina Kim.

John Izod

One of them, an ink drawing of John, I turned into a drypoint print “The Devil You Know?”

I love drypoint because it is the most immediate of the printmaking techniques and closest to free hand drawing.

I am still to break through the intimidation of the metal and draw directly on the plate. At the moment I mostly copy my drawings to the plate and then re-trace the lines with the steel point… Freedom isn’t easy.

John IS easy though. On the second day of the sittings he came armed and said, he’d be drawing me. Here are a couple of drawings he did of me:

Me by John Izod. Portrait exchange. Me by John 1
Me by John Izod. Portrait exchange.

Me by John 2?

Last week I had portrait drawings commissioned. There is a nice continuity to it – a little more than a year ago I drew the older child, Isobel, who at the time was a tiny baby. And now I met her again (big change!) together with her little brother Sam. I hope I get to draw or paint them again some time in the future, to keep the record going!

Isobel turned into a very bubbly and bright young lady and baby Sam was sweet. He couldn’t quite decide whether to trust me or not, one minute giving me a lovely big smile and the other – urgently needing the reassurance from the mummy.

One and a half hours for the session, and drawing the two children, I relied on the television to have them slightly more stationary than it would have been without it. My plan worked. As a result, I had about 12 drawings, half of which were rather nice, all done while they watched the “Beauty and the Beast”.

I love drawing young children, and regret that I didn’t do more drawings of my children when they were younger. Now they are too aware of being looked at.

Georgina, mummy of Isobel and Sam, kindly let me use their images for creating original prints. Two of the drawings from the first series, of baby Isobel, are now drypoint prints: “Asleep” and “Flat Out”. I am hoping to have new drypoint prints done in the near future, based on the new sketches of both children.

Dear Georgina, thank you for the beautiful models! I’ll be sending the new prints as soon as they are ready. Souvenirs for the grandparents 🙂

Portrait sketches of baby Isobel. Example of a portrait commission resulting in a portfolio of quick drawings.

[flagallery gid=9 name=”drawings”]

This portrait commission requires a life sitting and takes between 1.5 to 2 hours. Although the term “sitting” is used here rather loosely.

I had several portrait commissions where I had to draw children. Of course, I couldn’t expect them to be sitting absolutely still! Here is a post about one such commission.

Faces Everywhere…

April 24, 2011

Funny how things get connected these days through thin invisible digital threads…

An artist came to the gallery today => I posted a link to his work => Someone “liked” my post => I went to see their blog => that reminded me of a drawing which happened long time ago…

That drawing “happened”. One of my daughters (don’t remember now which one of them) made a little doodle with watercolours on  the back of one of my rejected prints. A charming toddler’s doodle. The ease, the precision, the confidence of naivety.

And, as usual, I saw a face in it. To make it more even more obvious I very lightly touched the drawing to add eyes, nose, lips.

I wish things “happened” more often.

…And then I go on to see what more that Someone-who-“liked”-me has to show, and he has this:

Everything is connected. Things do happen. And I imagine that I know and notice. And that should be enough.